Walter Citrine’s dealings with communism and communists

Walter Citrine served as TUC general secretary from the time of the General Strike to the arrival of the post-war Labour Government. Though sometimes seen as a hardline anti-communist, his relationship with communism in the UK and internationally deserves a more nuanced understanding, as his biographer Dr Jim Moher explains Continue reading Walter Citrine’s dealings with communism and communists

Workers of the Empire Unite: introducing book 15 in the Studies in Labour History series

Co-editor Yann Béliard introduces the latest volume in the Studies in Labour History book series. In most studies of British decolonisation, the world of labour is neglected, the key roles being allocated to metropolitan statesmen and native elites. Instead this volume focuses on the role played by working people, their experiences, initiatives and organisations, in the dissolution of the British Empire, both in the metropole … Continue reading Workers of the Empire Unite: introducing book 15 in the Studies in Labour History series

Dan Horne (Northumbria) on the British Left’s response to fascism at home and in Europe

My dissertation examines the way in which the British Left contributed to the anti-fascist cause in 1930s Europe. I will observe how the British Left reacted to the rise of fascism within Germany, Austria and Italy, whilst also exploring their reaction towards Oswald Mosley and the BUF at home. This dissertation will attempt to draw attention to how key campaigners sought to gain wider support … Continue reading Dan Horne (Northumbria) on the British Left’s response to fascism at home and in Europe

Marie Mrvova (Huddersfield) on using oral history to uncover the stories of women political prisoners

With the bursary awarded to me by the Society for the Study of Labour History, I was able to travel to the Czech Republic and successfully conduct oral history interviews for my research on women political prisoners and prison culture in Czechoslovakia 1948–1968. I will retell the stories of seven women (including my great-grandmother) using various materials, such as memoirs, biographies, archival materials, personal letters … Continue reading Marie Mrvova (Huddersfield) on using oral history to uncover the stories of women political prisoners

Jules Durand, unsung human rights hero

Jules Durand (1880-1926) was a French longshoreman who led a strike of coal-porters in Le Havre in 1910, and was condemned to death after a frame-up organized by the Compagnie générale transatlantique, the leading shipper. June 15 2018 will be the one hundredth anniversary of his judicial rehabilitation and the association – Amis de Jules Durand – is planning a series of events to commemorate the … Continue reading Jules Durand, unsung human rights hero

Ben Partridge visits Paris to compare strike photography in 1936 and 1968

This trip to Paris was a central part of the archival research for my PhD, an entangled comparison of the strike photography of 1936 and 1968. I will analyse the common threads running through the representation of both movements, but also how the medium contributed to the substantial legacies and mythologies each has taken on, and how this responded to their changing historiographies. It has … Continue reading Ben Partridge visits Paris to compare strike photography in 1936 and 1968

Britain and the Russian Revolution, 1917-1928

The Modern Records Centre, University of Warwick, has completed a project to digitise some of its archive holdings on the relationship between Britain and Russia / the Soviet Union in the decade after the Russian Revolution. The digital collection contains just over 650 documents (with full text transcriptions) – reports, correspondence, photographs, memoranda, ephemera and more – including documents from the archives of the Trades … Continue reading Britain and the Russian Revolution, 1917-1928