Society names LHR essay prize winner for 2022

The Society for the Study of Labour History is pleased to announce a winner for the 2022 Labour History Review postgraduate essay competition. The competition awards an annual prize of £500 for the best essay, which will also be published in Labour History Review. This year’s award goes to Gregory Billam for his essay entitled ’Breakdown in the Communist Anglosphere? The Communist Party of Great … Continue reading Society names LHR essay prize winner for 2022

Labour History Review Volume 87 (2022), Issue 2

Labour History Review Volume 87 (2022), Issue 2 has now been published. Contemporary images of the 1926 General Strike often show smiling volunteers good-naturedly going about the business of keeping the country running. In this issue of Labour History Review, Liam Ryan explores the involvement of often middle-class strike breakers in the period 1911-1926 and lifts the lid on the unexplored darker and often violent … Continue reading Labour History Review Volume 87 (2022), Issue 2

Citizen strike breakers: volunteers, strikes and the state in Britain, 1911-1926

Author: Liam RyanThis is the abstract of an article published in Labour History Review (2022), 87, (2), 109-140. Read more. This article provides the first systematic historical study of volunteer strike-breaking across a relatively broad time frame, focusing specifically on the period between 1911 and 1926. These years bore witness to the largest industrial conflict in British history, encompassing the Great Labour Unrest of 1911-14, … Continue reading Citizen strike breakers: volunteers, strikes and the state in Britain, 1911-1926

Bolshevization, Stalinization, and Party Ritual: The Congresses of the Communist Party of Great Britain, 1920-1943

Author: Kevin MorganThis is the abstract of an article published in Labour History Review (2022), 87, (2), 141-182. Read more. This paper examines the national congresses of the Communist Party of Great Britain (CPGB) in the period of the Communist International (1919-43). Both in Britain and internationally, communist party congresses in this period lost any independent decision-making role and became a mechanism activated and controlled … Continue reading Bolshevization, Stalinization, and Party Ritual: The Congresses of the Communist Party of Great Britain, 1920-1943

‘The Bricks and Mortar of All Policy Areas Which Concern Government’: Statistics and the Labour Force Survey at its UK Origins

Author: Linda ArchThis is the abstract of an article published in Labour History Review (2022), 87, (2), 183-211. Read more. On 1 January 1973, the UK joined the European Economic Community and, in its capacity as a member state, conducted a Labour Force Survey in that year for the first time. The purpose of this article is to contribute to the history of the Labour … Continue reading ‘The Bricks and Mortar of All Policy Areas Which Concern Government’: Statistics and the Labour Force Survey at its UK Origins

Book reviews in Labour History Review Volume 87 (2022), Issue 2

The books listed below are reviewed in Labour History Review (2022), 87, (2), 213-225. Find out more. Peter Gurney reviews Ian Gasse, Something to Build On: The Co-operative Movement in Dumfries, 1847-1914, Dumfries: the author, in association with the Scottish Labour History Society, 2021, pp. xvi + 240, h/b, £18, ISBN 978 19163 05021 Quentin Outram reviews Laura Humphreys, Globalising Housework: Domestic Labour in Middle-Class London Homes, 1850-1914, … Continue reading Book reviews in Labour History Review Volume 87 (2022), Issue 2

Classics of labour history: a research programme for the 1960s and beyond

The Society for the Study of Labour History was launched on 6 May 1960 in a meeting room at Birkbeck College, University of London. Those present included many of the big names of what was then a rapidly rising specialist area of historical study, including Raymond Postgate and Henry Pelling. Others, among them Eric Hobsbawm and Ralph Miliband, were yet to publish much of the … Continue reading Classics of labour history: a research programme for the 1960s and beyond

Classics of labour history: Malcolm Chase and the story of Chartism

Chartism has been a central part of labour history since the discipline emerged. A brief flurry of activity in the early 1920s led nowhere in particular, but Professor Asa Briggs’ Chartist Studies (1959) opened the door to what Dr Stephen Roberts has dubbed a ‘golden period’ of research and publication (see below). Dorothy Thompson, meanwhile, led the intellectual effort to centre Chartism not just as … Continue reading Classics of labour history: Malcolm Chase and the story of Chartism

Classics of labour history: John L. Halstead on the life of Royden Harrison

Any organisation that has been in existence for more than half a century is bound to endure the loss of much-loved and admired members whose long years of service have mirrored their professional progress from rising stars to elder statesmen and women. In this obituary, published in Labour History Review in 2003, Dr John L. Halstead, who himself died in 2021 (obituary), recorded the career … Continue reading Classics of labour history: John L. Halstead on the life of Royden Harrison