Red Wedge badges: from Constructivism to Neil Kinnock and the Style Council

Red Wedge brought both music and the most cutting edge designs to Labour politics in the mid 1980s. Mark Crail looks at the badges coveted by a generation – and at the organisation that produced them. The platform was too small for the numerous politicians and musicians intent on making their presence felt in front of a battery of press cameras. But despite the crush, … Continue reading Red Wedge badges: from Constructivism to Neil Kinnock and the Style Council

Daily Herald’s front page reports the first Labour government and the death of Lenin

What a day to be a headline writer on a Labour newspaper. On 23 January 1924, the TUC-owned Daily Herald led its news coverage with the formation of the first ever Labour government. But big as it was, the story had to share the front page with news from Moscow of the sudden death of Lenin. Born out of a strike bulletin first published by … Continue reading Daily Herald’s front page reports the first Labour government and the death of Lenin

Labour Party League of Youth members’ badge

The Labour Party began to recruit individual members in 1918, and youth sections appeared in a handful of divisional party organisations soon afterwards. But it was not until 1924 that the National Executive Committee formalised their existence and established a Labour Party League of Youth to act as a national co-ordinating body – albeit one with strictly limited representation and voice within the party’s structures. … Continue reading Labour Party League of Youth members’ badge

Using Trade Union Banners for Education: the case of the 1938 ‘red’ Follonsby miners’ banner

This article considers the use of trade union banners as tools for mainstream education in the context of the recent reclamation, recuperation, and rearticulation of industrial heritage taking place in localities in the former Durham coalfield, north-east England. Continue reading Using Trade Union Banners for Education: the case of the 1938 ‘red’ Follonsby miners’ banner

‘These Apish Tricks’: Newspaper Cartooning and the Struggle for the Labour Party, 1900–1914

Author: Samuel S. HydeThis is the abstract of an article published in Labour History Review (2020), 85, (2), 157–197. Find out more. The Labour Party’s use of cartoons is an underexplored aspect of its history. This article examines the role of cartooning in Labour’s formative struggles, as a constituent of the cultural processes that helped shape the Labour alliance, prior to the First World War. From … Continue reading ‘These Apish Tricks’: Newspaper Cartooning and the Struggle for the Labour Party, 1900–1914

Ben Partridge visits Paris to compare strike photography in 1936 and 1968

This trip to Paris was a central part of the archival research for my PhD, an entangled comparison of the strike photography of 1936 and 1968. I will analyse the common threads running through the representation of both movements, but also how the medium contributed to the substantial legacies and mythologies each has taken on, and how this responded to their changing historiographies. It has … Continue reading Ben Partridge visits Paris to compare strike photography in 1936 and 1968