Peterloo 1819: the short and long historical view

Most historians take short historical views. There are practical reasons for this, especially when having to produce for dissertations during a limited time period, but more mature historians can be under similar pressure from research assessment exercises. The literature on Peterloo provides an example. The recent definitive book by Robert Poole, Peterloo: The English Uprising (Oxford, 2019) is an essentially short view of 1819, even … Continue reading Peterloo 1819: the short and long historical view

Peterloo: digitised sources available

Working in partnership with the School of Social Sciences’ sociology department, The University of Manchester Library has digitised a unique collection of documents reflecting the events, and aftermath, of the Peterloo Massacre. This set of material provides a range of perspectives on that day’s tragic events and its legacy.‌ It includes a full run of the radical newspaper, the Manchester Observer (1818-1822), whose editor, James Wroe, was … Continue reading Peterloo: digitised sources available

SSLH to sponsor radical hero Henry Hunt at People’s History Museum

The Society for the Study of Labour History are set to sponsor a ‘Radical Hero’ in support of the People’s History Museum, Manchester. Opting for the radical orator and hero of the Peterloo Massacre, Henry Hunt, the Society will provide £3,000 towards the continued work of the ‘national museum of democracy’. The museum hopes to attract sponsors for ’100 Radical Heroes’ and lists many unsponsored … Continue reading SSLH to sponsor radical hero Henry Hunt at People’s History Museum

David Strittmatter (Buffalo) on the erasure of St Peter’s Field as a site of commemoration

The great E.P. Thompson wrote in his magisterial The Making of the English Working Class that ‘1819 was a rehearsal for 1832’. Thompson drew a direct line from the Peterloo Massacre to the Great Reform Act. Indeed, the crowd of 60,000 that gathered in an open space near St. Peter’s Church in central Manchester on August 16, 1819, came to hear reform-minded speakers. Famously, the … Continue reading David Strittmatter (Buffalo) on the erasure of St Peter’s Field as a site of commemoration